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Tagged: Benefits of Inclusive Employment Series

​Benefits of Inclusive Employment Part 7: Presentation of a Diverse Workforce

- by Maia Idzikowski

Over time, society has evolved to accept individuals no matter their shape, size, race, religion or ethnicity. Canada’s Employment Equity Act (1986) ensures that designated groups (Women, Visible Minorities, Aboriginal People, and Persons with a Disability) are protected against systemic barriers and given equal opportunity within the workforce, and the general public is outraged when they discover that women are being paid significantly less than men in some cases. Moreover, Section 15 of Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms ensures that “every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability”.

While individuals with intellectual disabilities are not always at the centre of discussions as are the other groups protected by Canada’s Employment Equity Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, they deserve the same opportunities as everyone else. But, like the other groups protected by the Act and Charter, they have to overcome greater barriers to become employed.

Most companies want to present a diverse workforce. Now that society is more accepting of diversity, so are employers. Most of us have personal experiences with diversity; either through personal or family experiences or through experiences of our friends, co-workers or community members. Because diversity is part of our lives, we want to see this diversity reflected in places of employment and business. Companies know that it is “good business” to reflect the image of society through employment and other policies. The natural next step in reflecting and celebrating diversity is to hire inclusively. Hiring inclusively sets companies ahead of their competitors; seen as a progressive brand with integrity, these companies will appeal to a larger base of consumers.

Presenting a diverse workforce looks good from all angles. An employee will be proud of the organization they work for, consumers will be proud to say that they support this company/business, and as a result, employers will see the benefits.

This thought concludes Community Living Manitoba’s 7 part series on Inclusive Employment. If you would like to learn more about Ready, Willing and Able, a national initiative partnered with Community Living Manitoba to promote and facilitate inclusive employment, contact:

Brian Rochat at (204) 781-0582

or email: rwa@aclmb.ca


 

​Benefits of Inclusive Employment Part 6: Enhanced Employer Public Image

- by Maia Idzikowski

The world contains an estimated 1.3 billion people with disabilities. Collectively, this is equivalent to the population of China. Over 200 million of these people have intellectual disabilities. The disabled population is a vast market of consumers and potential employees. It has even been stated that “the disability opportunity is comparable with that of the ‘green’ marketing opportunity of recent decades”.

Consumers are drawn to brands with integrity. I try to buy fair trade chocolate, and sweatshop free clothing, and tend to support companies and businesses that celebrate diversity by hiring inclusively. Generally, “People of all ages and backgrounds now prefer brands that are inclusive, socially aware and that act in-line with their values as consumers and employees”.

Companies that promote inclusion by hiring individuals with intellectual disabilities or on the Autism Spectrum are not only seen as fair and just by consumers, but by their employees as well. Employees who are proud of the company they work for are more willing to collaborate, which helps create a cohesive, team oriented workforce. Employees who see their employer in a positive light are less likely to quit their jobs, and more likely to strive for further opportunities within that business or company.

Disney, for instance, is well-known for making their theme parks accessible to all, regardless of ability or disability. Disney, as a result, has a very positive brand image. The Return on Disability Report states that “the company that can solve barriers facing extreme users will improve usability for the average user”, and this is precisely what Disney has done. In making the theme parks accessible for individuals with disabilities, it becomes more accessible for everyone else. The Report also indicates that “the most impressive aspect of how Disney deals with disability is the way in which they talk about it. It is not a compliance issue, but part of the customer experience”.

It all boils down to the fact that hiring inclusively and catering to the 1.3 billion people with disabilities is good for business. By widening an organization’s marketing and hiring bases, consumers and employees will see that organization in a positive light. Overall, an enhanced employer and public image is an obtainable goal for all companies and businesses, and hiring inclusively is the best way to get started.

Ready, Willing, and Able (RWA) is a national initiative partnered with Community Living Manitoba to promote inclusive employment. If you would like to learn more about RWA or inclusive employment, contact:

Brian Rochat at (204) 781-0582

or email: rwa@aclmb.ca

*All statistics and quotes taken from the 2014 Annual Report on Disability: The Global Economics of Disability.


 

​Benefits of Inclusive Employment Part 5: Pride in the Job/Organizational Loyalty

- by Maia Idzikowski

When people can see the impact their work is making, it is very rewarding and amplifying to one's sense of self. This applies to everyone in society, not just individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Finding a job that is meaningful and impactful is proven to be difficult, especially when entering the workforce for the first time. For individuals with intellectual disabilities, finding "real work for real pay" is challenging, but the benefits of such a work placement are endless.

When these individuals see tangible and favourable outcomes from their work (completing tasks, helping customers, etc...), they are empowered. These individuals are proud of their accomplishments, and will continue to be a source of positivity and empowerment for others in their world.

When individuals with intellectual disabilities are proud of their work, they will also feel loyal to the organization they are working for. They will want to continue working, and will tell their friends and family all about their positive and rewarding experiences.

Other employees will also see the employer in a positive light. They will see the company as fair, and as having integrity. Other employees, in turn, will experience organizational loyalty. The businesses that take the needs of their employees into consideration are the ones with the greatest organizational loyalty. Companies where employees feel proud and empowered by their work are the most successful, because they present a unified, cohesive workforce.

Ultimately, hiring an individual with an intellectual disability will create a team-oriented atmosphere. As a result, all team members will feel empowered, and excited to be at work.

According to the Q12 Meta-Analysis Report, employees experience organizational loyalty if they can answer ‘yes’ to the following questions:

Q00: (Overall Satisfaction) On a five-point scale, where “5” is extremely satisfied and “1” is extremely dissatisfied, how satisfied are you with (your company) as a place to work?

Q01: I know what is expected of me at work.

Q02: I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right.

Q03: At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day.

Q04: In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work.

Q05: My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person.

Q06: There is someone at work who encourages my development.

Q07: At work, my opinions seem to count.

Q08: The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important.

Q09: My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work.

Q10: I have a best friend at work.

Q11: In the last six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress.

Q12: This last year, I have had opportunities at work to learn and grow.

If employees answer ‘no’ in response to the majority of these questions, areas for improvement are identified. The Q12 questions can also illustrate if a company is a good candidate for inclusive employment. If the employees can answer ‘yes’ to the majority of these questions, then perhaps the company should consider hiring individuals with intellectual disabilities.


For more information about inclusive employment or if you would like to schedule an appointment with Community Living Manitoba’s Labour Market Facilitator for Ready, Willing and Able,
email: Brian Rochat at rwa@aclmb.ca

or call at (204) 781-0582

Stay tuned for part 6 of the Benefits of Inclusive Employment Series!


 

​Benefits of Inclusive Employment Part 4: Positive Attitude

- by Maia Idzikowski

I remember when I got my first job. I had just turned 16, and was so excited to finally be entering the workforce. I was slightly nervous, motivated to work hard, and empowered that the company had picked me over other applicants. People with intellectual disabilities feel the same way when they enter into the workforce. They are excited, a little bit nervous, and determined to work hard.

As discussed in previous segments, individuals with intellectual disabilities appreciate an employment opportunity more than anyone else. They have to overcome greater barriers to obtain a position and often develop a very deep sense of gratitude towards the employer.

When employees are grateful, excited and determined to be entering into the workforce, they will maintain a positive attitude while working. Positivity is contagious; other co-workers, managers and customers will also be affected.

The quote “positive minds lead positive lives” (anonymous), is applicable to inclusive employment. Individuals with intellectual disabilities will instill positivity into the minds of those they are working with. They will also make a massive contribution to the morale of the organization or business, creating a friendly, team-oriented, and accepting atmosphere where every employee feels like they belong.

A welcoming workplace where everyone feels safe and included will be attractive to prospective employees, while creating a supportive, cohesive workforce.

In the end, hiring an individual with an intellectual disability is going to make everyone happy. Customers will be thrilled to be served by such friendly employees, and co-workers will find the welcoming workplace to be exciting and refreshing. For all stakeholders, this is a win-win situation!

For more information about inclusive employment or if you would like to schedule an appointment with Community Living Manitoba’s Labour Market Facilitator for Ready, Willing and Able,
email: Brian Rochat at rwa@aclmb.ca

or call at (204) 781-0582


 

​Benefits of Inclusive Employment Part 3: Reduced Turnover

- by Maia Idzikowski

Hiring inclusively has a multitude of benefits. Employers who hire individuals with intellectual disabilities report a reduced employee turnover.

This makes sense. In part 1 of this series, we established that individuals with intellectual disabilities or ASD are appreciative of employment opportunities. They are hard workers, who pay close attention to detail and are excited to be entering into the workforce. As a result, these individuals are less likely to quit their job than the ‘average’ employee.

For the employer, what this really boils down to is that hiring individuals with intellectual disabilities or ASD is good for business. These employees are among the most dependable. They are ready to make a long-term commitment to their workplace, and will strive to do the best job possible. An organization or company that can keep employees for many years is also extremely attractive to potential employees. They will see the company as fair and reliable, and will be more likely to make a long-term commitment themselves.

Ultimately, hiring individuals with intellectual disabilities or ASD reduces employee turnover, establishing the company as consistent and dependable.

Stay tuned for Part 4 of the Ready, Willing, and Able Series on Inclusive Employment.


 

​Benefits of Inclusive Employment Part 2: Co-Worker Partnerships

- by Admin User

Monday's segment established that individuals with intellectual disabilities are hard-working and appreciate opportunities, resulting in consistent attendance at place of employment.

As emphasis shift toward establishing and promoting inclusive and supportive workplaces, innovative employers are understanding that individuals with intellectual disabilities are more likely to have an outgoing, positive attitude in the workplace. Why? This is simply due to their mentality of appreciation; when an employment opportunity is exciting and valuable to an individual, they will have a positive outlook on that opportunity. Moreover, workplace inclusion is essential for social inclusion. A positive attitude is contagious, and will result in a friendly, outgoing workforce, where co-workers get along and work together. An individual with an intellectual disability is more likely to collaborate and work together with their co-workers, creating an engaging work environment. Moreover, this will build a team-oriented atmosphere, and create a unified workforce. In service orientated industries positive and friendly employee attitudes can drive sales and increase profit margins.

Ready, Willing, and Able (RWA) is a national initiative working together with Community Living Manitoba to promote inclusive employment. RWA has released a list of 7 key benefits that arise out of inclusive employment.

Stay tuned for Part 3.


 

​Benefits of Inclusive Employment Part 1: Consistent Attendance

- by Maia Idzikowski

Ready, Willing, and Able (RWA), is a national initiative partnered with Community Living Manitoba to promote inclusive employment. RWA has released a list of 7 key benefits that arise out of hiring an individual with an intellectual disability.

Every day this week, one of these benefits will be highlighted on the Community Living Manitoba blog and Facebook page.

To begin, when many people think about inclusive employment, there is a common misconception that people with intellectual disabilities cannot produce the same quality of work as the rest of the population. This belief is false. In fact, individuals with disabilities such as Asperger’s or Autism have an exceptional memory, and enjoy tasks that require precision, repetition, and attention to detail. They also have the ability to ‘think outside the box’, which allows them to solve problems creatively.

When given the opportunity for ‘real work for real pay’, people with disabilities are driven to work hard, and will therefore be committed to consistently attend their place of employment. Seldom will they call in sick or arrive late for work. When employers compare the general workforce to someone with an intellectual disability or on the Autism Spectrum, they generally report less absenteeism, and punctual attendance amongst employees with an intellectual disability and/or ASD. Simply put, employees with an intellectual disability are less likely to miss a shift, call in sick or quit their job leaving the business understaffed to perform and serve customers.

Out of all adults with intellectual disabilities living in Canada today, 500,000 or roughly 75% are unemployed (statistics from CACL’s RWA Initiative). In the world of work, these individuals overcome greater barriers than the general workforce. Individuals with intellectual disabilities, as a result, appreciate opportunities, and have a drive to prove themselves in the workplace.

Stay tuned for Part 2!


 

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